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Google’s Social Circle Growing

Aug 5, 2010   //   by FreshTraffic   //   apps, Google, internet news, social media, social network  //  Comments Off
With their sink or swim approach to business, Google Wave has crashed. At the end of the year, Wave will be dismantled, some portions being retained and used in current and future apps. Wave was an innovation in collaberation, which was great once you got the hang of it. Intuitive however, it was not. To work with, and discover Wave’s nuances you had to keep at it, and learn as you work with your friends and colleagues.

Meanwhile, on the hands free end of the news, smartphones running the Android platform has reached the point of 200,000 activations per day. The conservative estimate is that as we approach the end of the year, it’ll be nearing the 30 million Androids in the public.
In a Nielson poll, Android based phones outsold the iPhone so far in 2010 (July outstanding), 27% for the Android versus 23% for the Apple iPhone. Loyalty may become a problem however, as iPhone users are happiest with their handsets (despite the antenna woes), with only 71% of Android owners and users being content enough to continue to use and upgrade their handset.

The ball may remain in Android’s court however, as with the platform being open source, any smartphone manufacturer can build and provide a phone that uses the software.

In the news to come column, Google has inked a deal to purchase Slide, a social app developer. Expected to be announced on Friday, this would mark a second large step in the social avenue of the web, along with Googles previous investment of more than $100 million into social gaming company Zynga.

Eric E. Schmidt, Google’s chief executive, said that social networking was important to Google:

“Search is going to get better with more social information.”

“We have understood for a long time that social stuff is very important. The question that’s in everyone’s minds is why are we trying to create a competitor to Facebook, and the answer is we’re not going to create a competitor to Facebook. It’s something different.

“It’s hard to see how we could end up as becoming a significant gaming or entertainment source,” he said. “It’s much more likely that we would become an infrastructure for those sorts of things.”

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