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Browsing "online"

Playboy restructuring print and online content

Jan 23, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   digital, online, Playboy, print  //  78 Comments

As part of the restructuring, the company will consolidate its print and online operations in Chicago, keeping a “small editorial and sales presence in New York,” but it expects to sublet its existing office space and move some licensing, editorial and publishing positions to Chicago — a move that is likely to lead to more layoffs.

The company promoted Jimmy Jellinek, previously division senior vice president of digital content, to editorial director of combined print and online content. That appointment was first reported by The New York Post on Thursday. Jellinek, former editor in chief of Maxim, will report to Hugh Hefner and be based in Chicago. Chris Napolitano, former editorial director of the magazine, will now serve as editor at large based in New York, as family obligations have prevented Napolitano from making the move to the Windy City.

Google Guy in Winnipeg

Jan 20, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   business, Forbes, Google, Manitoba, online, Winnipeg  //  6 Comments

It must be Winnipeg, Manitoba’s best kept secret having a former Google Director here in the city. While company’s struggle with the economic downturn to keep their businesses afloat, others are flourishing with there online presence. While a recession looms, online sales were at a all time high in December in Canada.

According to Forbes magazine, a Page 1 ranking with Google is the holy grail for any business.

So why then isn’t every business in Winnipeg knocking down the doors of the offices of the Google Guy here?

He has made millions of dollars online for companies worldwide, helped governments get elected and made millionaires out of one man band businesses.

What was he thinking setting up a head office in Winnipeg?

I spoke with the Ex Google Guy who sold out in 2004 to the search engine. I asked what he saw in Winnipeg to make him move here.

Opportunity he tells me and lots of it, but the people here don’t realize it yet. You have large, well-respected corporations here with very limited web presence, websites that could be monetized in abundance, all with low overheads.

So why aren’t people knocking down your door?

I think they are a little backwards when it comes to the Internet. They are stuck in there old fashion ways and traditional media, with like minded people that have no expertize apart from what they read about on forums or books. Google doesn’t tell you how it works in books or forums, that’s why there are very few REAL experts out there.

We only take one client in each niche market and we don’t advertise that much, the people that know KNOW.

Everywhere web designers, students, copy writers, guys who have been on a 3 day SEO course are jumping on the gravy train because they can see big bucks to be made. All of a sudden all these firms are experts on the Internet, but do they have the client’s best interest in mind. It’s a joke really but that’s life.

Winnipeg is the jewel in the crown. Cream always rises to the top:-)

Big Jump In Watching TV Online

Aug 26, 2008   //   by FreshTraffic   //   internet advertising, online  //  18 Comments

The number of people using the internet to catch up on their favourite TV shows has almost doubled in the past year.

Watching TV online increased among the British public from 9% of households in 2007 to 17% in 2008, according to a report by the communications regulator Ofcom.

Viewers are increasingly watching programmes when they want and how they want rather than relying on TV schedules, the report suggested.

It is particularly popular among the 15 to 24-year-old age group, with 26% of them using the internet to watch TV in 2008, up 16% in 12 months.

More than half (51%) used it to watch video clips and webcasts.

The report also found that people in the UK spent a record amount of time on the phone last year.

And for the first time young people have become more attached to their mobiles than television.

They watched nearly an hour less TV each week (17 hours) in 2007 than they did in 2002.

Pensioners are increasingly surfing the internet with take-up of computers, mobiles, the internet and digital TV growing at a faster rate among older people than the rest of the population.

The so-called silver surfer, whose interest in such technology has been low until now, is particularly keen on using the internet for email, instant messaging and chat rooms, while a fifth also contribute to someone else’s blog.

Over-65s spend 90 minutes more time online at home each day than their younger counterparts.

For the first time, more money was spent on online advertising spend than the combined advertising spend on ITV1, Channel 4, S4C and Five.

The Internet is full

Apr 7, 2008   //   by FreshTraffic   //   internet, online  //  288 Comments

Is online video and TV streaming clogging the copper arteries of the information superhighway?

It’s generally accepted by anyone and everyone in the know that the internet is growing exponentially. To give you an idea of how much and how fast, consider that last year YouTube alone used as much bandwidth as was needed for the entire internet in 2000.

Trouble is, this growing demand for video and TV download services such as the Beeb’s recently launched and already successful iPlayer is overloading networks so badly that some particularly gloomy experts are predicting the internet could simply grind to a virtual standstill by 2010. They are calling it the broadband crunch.

The problem lies not in the fibre optics and underground cables of the main internet ‘motorways’ which have huge capacities and are constantly upgraded with new technologies but with the ‘last mile’ routers, switchers and copper wires running from exchanges directly into the home.

“There are going to be some real crunches, some real hard times coming. It’s because of the market and the business models which don’t see a way of making a profit,” commented Scott Bradner, technology security officer at Harvard University ahead of an ‘End of the Internet’ debate happening in Boston this month.

Essentially, internet providers are too busy undercutting each other to maximise short term profits without considering the long term implications of neglecting the infrastructure.

“There will not be a fibre-to-the-home network in the next 20 years,” according to BT spokesman Mike Bartlett. “It would be a massive call to say, “Let’s fibre up the nation.” It would take many years, cost billions of pounds [actually estimated at around £20billion], involve digging up all the roads and we don’t know if people really want it.”

There are new technologies in the pipeline that could eradicate these problems, such as nuclear research organisation Cern’s fibre optic linked servers that run 10,000 times faster than broadband. But timescale and guarantees are hard to come by.

As Larry Irving, co-chairman of the Internet Innovation Alliance so eloquently puts it, “We’re not saying it’s going meltdown, but you could have latency. It’ll be like trying to get from point A to point B in London on a Wednesday afternoon. Good luck.”

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