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Browsing "internet news"

The year in Google

Dec 17, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet, internet news  //  126 Comments

2009 was a big year in the technology industry. Live search was rebranded and marketed, Wolfram Alpha (remember them?) came online with it’s “answer engine”, and social media went another step up what with Facebooking and Twittering, blogging and real time results starting to make their way into your searches.

But seeing as Google is the big fish in the waters of the web, here’s a quickly compiled list of some of their advancements through out the year.

January
* Offline Gmail gets released with Google Gears
* Picasa for Mac released

February
* Google Latitude and search by voice for Android launch
* Google Sync for your mobile phone launches

March
* Google Calendar goes offline with Google Gears

April
* Google Profiles show up at the bottom of search results
* Updated mobile Gmail and Google Calendar webapps for iPhone and Android launch
* Google Maps mashup tracks swine flu
* GV Mobile makes Google Voice the default for your iPhone (later, Apple pulled this app from the iTunes Store for reasons that are still unclear)

May
* Engineers demo Google Wave at the Google I/O conference, give developers access to the Wave “sandbox”

June
* Google Apps Sync syncs Microsoft Outlook with Gmail, Google Contacts, and Calendars (updates with push Gmail in September)
* Google Squared puts your search results into a spreadsheet
* Gmail, Google Calendar, Docs, and Talk leave beta

July
* FeedDemon, NetNewsWire sync exclusively with Google Reader
* Google announces Chromium OS (but doesn’t release any code, doctored screenshots and fan-made versions start popping up)
* Apple rejects all Google Voice applications from the iTunes Store
* Gmail Tasks graduates from Google Labs (where it first appeared in December of 2008)

August
* Gmail makes importing mail and contacts from old email accounts easy
* PubSubHubbub gets baked into Google Reader

September
* Google Wave Preview opens to 100,000 users
* GrandCentral closes its doors, transitions entirely to Google Voice
* Google Sidewiki launches

October
* Google offers voicemail storage and transcriptions for your existing phone number (part of Google Voice)
* Google Maps Navigation adds turn-by-turn GPS to Android
* Google Voice gives existing users invitations to send to their friends

November
* Chrome OS announced, Chromium build demo’ed and source code released (here’s how you can try out a Chromium build yourself)
* Google Chrome adds bookmark sync
* Google releases Go, a new programming language

December
* Chrome browser hits Mac/Linux with extensions enabled (Chrome for Windows left beta in December of 2008)
* Google’s new real-Time search includes Twitter streams
* Google Public DNS launches
* Google “lets the sun set” on Gears, moving to HTML5
* Google Goggles for Android searches the web by photo
* Google Favorite Places puts a barcode on restaurants and shops you can scan with your mobile phone

Look here, to read more of any of the above.

Googling for Real(time)?

Dec 7, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet news, search engine marketing  //  339 Comments

Google announced it’s gone realtime, meaning essetially that if they think it’s worth you knowing what was said 10 minutes ago about what you’re interested in, they’ll share that with you!

“If high quality information is coming in, then we will show it,” said Amit Singhal, a Google fellow who heads Google’s ranking systems and oversaw the development of the new real time system.

Some of the information comes to you live from :

Tweets from Twitter
Content from Google News
Content from Google Blog Search
Newly created web pages
Freshly updated web pages
FriendFeed updateearch system
Content from Facebook and MySpace is promised

How the information ranked? Singhal said only information deemed highly relevant is included. So spammy tweets, low quality pages and other content might not make it into the real time search “layer” that is used. After that, results are ranked by time.

In the end, it’s going to make all of your social media concerns, more applicable in the SEO world. Become an authority organically, maintain quality content in the socail sector, and enjoy top of the hill rankings all around.

Google, indexing the world 1 page at a time.

Dec 4, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet, internet news  //  5 Comments

Google has stepped up it’s bid in the quest to own the web, GoogleDNS is here. DNS servers are, in many respects, the backbone of the Internet. DNS allows you to type a domain name like www.senate.gov into a browser instead of a machine-readable IP number like http://156.33.195.33/. Google DNS will allow users to bypass their ISPs Domain Name Servers (DNS).

Google, being a huge ally in the war for net neutrality, makes throwing it’s hat into the DNS ring a bold move. Just like all software, hardware, or inteernet company, the bigger the concern, the harsher the scrutiny. The hand waving and doomsday prophesizing about Googles cloud computing capabilities anytime they have a hiccup being an example.

That being said, Google has made a couple of promises in regards to GoogleDNS. Google’s FAQ states they will only keep temporary logs and erase all the information it collects through the public DNS service within 24 to 45 hours. The company promises not to keep any information that is linked to IP addresses in its permanent logs. Just providing another option out there for those inclined to give it a swing.

Knowing the web, is about power. Those who know most, have the most power, and adding this feather in the Google cap, is just another tool in a wide assortment of available information collectors. As it stands now, who really knows the web better than Google?

One interesting.. concession that Google makes however:

..because nameservers geolocate according to the resolver’s IP address rather than the user’s, Google Public DNS has the same limitations as other open DNS services: that is, the server to which a user is referred might be farther away than one to which a local DNS provider would have referred. This could cause a slower browsing experience for certain sites.

In easy read, depending on where you are, your internet might actually get slower by using GoogleDNS, not faster.

2009 in Search

Dec 2, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet news  //  142 Comments

Google released their list this year for what was most popular in search. Some of the excerpts include :


Fastest Rising Search (Michael Jackson)
Fastest Falling Search (Beijing 2008)
U.S. Fastest Rising Searches by Quarter (Swine Flu #1)
Fastest Rising/Falling Searches on Google.com; Google News; Google Images; Google Maps; Google Mobile
“In the News Categories” like the All Eyes on the Senate, Keeping it Green, Bailout Nation, and More
That’s Entertaining (Entertainment-Related Searches)
Around the Home


In their blog post, Google talked about social media, music news this year, and in the fastest falling trends held some surprises as well.

So what has captivated the minds of searchers around the world this year? As millions of fans said goodbye to the King of Pop, Michael Jackson led the list of our top 10 fastest rising queries across the globe. And a new star was born, too — quirky pop singer Lady Gaga became a search sensation the world over. In addition to appearing on many regional fastest-rising search term lists, from the Czech Republic to Switzerland and Kenya to the United Kingdom, Lady Gaga also landed in the #9 spot on the global fastest rising list.

…the social web is alive and well. In a sweeping confirmation of the web’s ability to connect us, both Facebook and the Spanish social-networking site Tuenti appeared on the fastest rising searches at #2 and #3 respectively. Twitter also made our global list for the first time at #5..

A grouping of the fastest rising, and falling trends, can be found on Google’s Zeitgeist of 2009.

Googling the News?

Nov 23, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet news, Media, microsoft  //  418 Comments

Google had better watch out; their foes are starting to rally together. A report today has the tech blogs in an uproar about a possible Microsoft/News Corp pact. The agreement would center around Microsoft paying News Corp to remove their listings from Google. The idea being, this would give Bing an edge over Google, as they’d be the only major engine to have access to News Corp sites.

These rumors fit with earlier info about the media giant’s plan to de-list content from Google. However, adding in the possibility of a pact between Microsoft and News Corp turns the de-listing from a business measure, to a direct attack on Google. While the talks are in an early stage, the rumor is that Microsoft is also talking to several other major content providers to ask them to de-list from Google.

Microsoft’s Bing holds nearly 10% of the U.S. search market. While they haven’t been able to pull any users out of Google’s hide yet, this could represent a major turning point. If MicroSoft can convince major content providers to leave Google, Bing could gain substantial ground on Google.

Will this new plan work? News Corp, and many other news media sites, are working to make all of their online content ‘for pay’. However, a recent survey showed that 80% of customers will not pay for online news. It’s very possible that this pact would just seal the death warrant of several old media dinosaurs. Google has already stated that news content is “not a big part” of their revenue.

If News Corp pushes the fracture between new and old media, it’s definite they’ll learn just which form of content distribution the mass of customers prefer. Sites like the Wall Street Journal have proven that paying for subscription services can work, but not for the bulk of news media sites. Refusing to adapt and pulling away from changing trends won’t save the old titans of media, and trying to cheap shot Google by getting newspapers to de-list won’t make Bing popular.

Tag Teaming Google?

Nov 12, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet news  //  1 Comment

Google is the goliath in the search industry, of that there’s no question. There has, as of yet, to be any real David to come along and topple them successfully. Is it really any surprise then, that the little guys are starting to gang up on the big kid?

Bing, has setup shop with WOlfram Alpha, the latter being touted as a quantitative search engine, rather than qualitive. Bing, already marketed and pushed as the decision engine, partnering with Wolfram, being the answer engine, does seem to make sense. The Wolfram team said the new partnership with Bing would allow Microsoft to access “tens of thousands of algorithms and trillions of pieces of data” to incorporate into its results. And, as an added bonus, Bing gets limited Facebook integration and tweaks its weather results.

How does Google respond? An announcement about tweaked movie searches, and password protection for your SafeSearch settings. It may not sound like a whole bunch, but SafeSearch *is* a big deal, privacy and website/image filtering is an extremely valid concern in this era of (completely) free speech.

Between Google Wave, Bing, Wolfram, streetview, Bing maps, Facebook/Twitter integration, and the ever expanding list of features between the engines, it’s getting to be a very busy and exciting time in search.

Google gets a shot, of Caffeine

Nov 10, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet news, search engine  //  1 Comment

For the last few months, Google has been working on self improvement classes so to speak. One of the mantras which the giant embraces:

To build a great web search engine, you need to:

1. Crawl a large chunk of the web.
2. Index the resulting pages and compute how reputable those pages are.
3. Rank and return the most relevant pages for users’ queries as quickly as possible.

So you need to be able to be mobile, intelligent, and fast. It’s no shock to anyone out there that Google has the largest index on the web, boasting some trillions of pages indexed. And of course, there is often a lot of wheat to be seperated from the chaff, which Google has always been (somewhat) brilliant at. Sometimes results were a little skewed, but that’s the price you pay for trying to be the biggest and the best, all at once. Speed, which never seems to be a factor when searching for your interest, *can* be a problem, depending on maintenance, downed data centers, connection hiccups, etc..

For good or for evil, Google is with us, and so deeply entrenched within the internet, it’s hard to imagine the web without it. Following the news this morning, that Google is ready to let their newest tech out of the door, Caffeine, get ready for the giant to go.. faster.

Like the bionic man, the aim of Caffeine is to make Google bigger, stronger, faster, and just all around better. While the average searcher/user probably won’t notice a difference, the idea that Google is about to get better at sorting relevant results, and faster at picking them up, is an exciting prospect as an SEO.

A step up

Nov 4, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   internet marketing, internet news, twitter  //  4 Comments

OneRiot, a real-time search engine for web and video content, has launched a new Twitter search engine with a unique angle: Rather than focus on what people are saying, the search engine focuses on the web pages people are linking to.

But whenever the subject of real-time search and/or Twitter search comes up, inevitably the argument heads to “too much meaningless chatter to find anything of value”. It’s a generally fair argument. But OneRiot thinks it’s found a way to cut through the layers of noise.

How Does It Work?

One Riot crawls Twitter, looking for tweets with embedded links, then crawls and indexes the content being linked to. The OneRiot search algorithm includes spam checking and has checks for relevance, and a “hotness” factor for URLs that are being talked about a lot in recent tweets.

As you do a search, you can see the focus is on content — the URLs people are discussing and sharing on Twitter. But Twitter being a social site, OneRiot’s search results also include some social elements for anyone who wants to dip into the conversation. Each result includes a reference to how recently the link was shared on Twitter, how many tweets mention it, and who first posted it on Twitter.

It’s a unique approach to Twitter search that should prove particularly beneficial to the business community embracing social media advertising. In a short time testing the service, I found that it does bypass a lot of the chatter, and leads more quickly to relevant content. And there’s convenience too, in that OneRiot’s search expands shortened links, so you can see the actual content link.

An alpha version of their Twitter search engine is available now at twitter.oneriot.com.

Ask Google

Nov 2, 2009   //   by FreshTraffic   //   Google, internet news, search marketing  //  2 Comments

In what may be a massive shift in the industry, Google announced the release of voice search for Mandarin Chinese for Nokia S60 phones. If Google gets it right, because of the massive population in China. It could drive more search usage and frequency. Google trails Baidu for search on the PC, but mobile search represents an opportunity for Google to grow share in that largest of all internet markets.

Google now says it understands a range of English accents, and Mandarin although it doesn’t yet get all accents in Mandarin. In addition, the capability will be coming soon to the Android and iPhone platforms in China. Dell has introduced a yet-to-be released Android handset (Mini 3i) and the iPhone just launched with the number two Chinese mobile carrier China Unicom. According to the Google Blog:

Although this only works on the Nokia S60 at the moment, we’re working on adding support for Mandarin speech recognition to our products on other mobile platforms, such as Android and iPhone. And bear in mind that this is a first version of our system in Mandarin, and it might not be as polished as our English version. For example, if you have a strong southern Chinese accent, it might not work as well as for people with a Beijing accent…

With almost 700 million mobile users in China, that’s more than 2X the US population as a whole. China Unicom reportedly has roughly 140 million subscribers, while the largest US carrier Verizon, has 89 million mobile subscribers. China Mobile, the largest carrier in China, has roughly 500 million users.